14k gold watch bands. Commemorative gold coin.

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1853 GOLD DOLLAR COIN : 1853 GOLD


1853 gold dollar coin : Gold toe windsor wool over the calf.



1853 Gold Dollar Coin





1853 gold dollar coin







    1853
  • Year 1853 (MDCCCLIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar).





    coin
  • Make (metal) into coins

  • make up; "coin phrases or words"

  • Make (coins) by stamping metal

  • a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as money

  • Invent or devise (a new word or phrase)

  • mint: form by stamping, punching, or printing; "strike coins"; "strike a medal"











1853 gold dollar coin - 1853 Cavalry




1853 Cavalry Quest for a Southwest Railroad Route


1853 Cavalry Quest for a Southwest Railroad Route



This being an edited version of the actual 1853 report submitted by Lieutenant R. S. Williamson to the Congress of the United States of America regarding his cavalry corps of engineers exploration and survey beginning in San Francisco and searching the mountains of Southern California, including Walker's Pass, Tejon, Tehachapi, Mojave, San Gorgonio Pass, Palm Springs, Warner's Pass, Yuma, San Diego and back to San Francisco. It details the instructions given for the search from Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis, the men included in the quest, their equipment and a nearly day by day description of the land, the people, and the happenings of the party. A very unique read. These highlights are taken from the complete and lengthy report kept on file by the U.S. Geological Society.

This being an edited version of the actual 1853 report submitted by Lieutenant R. S. Williamson to the Congress of the United States of America regarding his cavalry corps of engineers exploration and survey beginning in San Francisco and searching the mountains of Southern California, including Walker's Pass, Tejon, Tehachapi, Mojave, San Gorgonio Pass, Palm Springs, Warner's Pass, Yuma, San Diego and back to San Francisco. It details the instructions given for the search from Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis, the men included in the quest, their equipment and a nearly day by day description of the land, the people, and the happenings of the party. A very unique read. These highlights are taken from the complete and lengthy report kept on file by the U.S. Geological Society.










83% (18)





$'s




$'s





By the American Revolution, Spanish dollars gained significance because they backed paper money authorized by the individual colonies and the Continental Congress.Common in the Thirteen Colonies, Spanish dollars were even legal tender in one colony, Virginia.
On April 2, 1792, U. S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton reported to Congress the precise amount of silver found in Spanish milled dollar coins in common use in the States. As a result, the United States Dollar was defined[4] as a unit of weight equaling 371 4/16th grains (24.057 grams) of pure silver, or 416 grains of standard silver (standard silver being defined as 1,485 parts fine silver to 179 parts alloy[5]). It was specified that the "money of account" of the United States should be expressed in those same "dollars" or parts thereof. Additionally, all lesser-denomination coins were defined as percentages of the dollar coin, such that a half-dollar was to contain half as much silver as a dollar, quarter-dollars would contain one-fourth as much, and so on.
In an act passed in January 1837, the dollar's alloy (amount of non-silver metal present) was set at 11%. Subsequent coins would contain the same amount of pure silver as previously, but were reduced in overall weight (to 412.25 grains). On February 21, 1853, the quantity of silver in the lesser coins was reduced, with the effect that their denominations no longer represented their silver content relative to dollar coins.
Various acts have subsequently been passed affecting the amount and type of metal in U. S. coins, so that today there is no legal definition of the term "dollar" to be found in U. S. statute.[6][7][8] Currently the closest thing to a definition is found in United States Code Title 31, Section 5116, paragraph b, subsection 2: "The Secretary [of the Treasury] shall sell silver under conditions the Secretary considers appropriate for at least $1.292929292 a fine troy ounce."
Silver was mostly removed from U. S. coinage by 1965 and the dollar became a free-floating fiat currency without a commodity backing defined in terms of real gold or silver. The US Mint continues to make silver $1-denomination coins, but these are not intended for general circulation.











1853-C $5.00 PCGS MS61




1853-C $5.00 PCGS MS61





Mintage: 305,770

North Georgia Collection pedigree. Variety 1. Nearly every branch mint gold coin currently in an MS61 holder holder was in a lower graded holder as recently as few years ago. Given the number of examples that have been graded MS61 (and better) by the two services, you’d think this was a reasonably common coin in Uncirculated. This is far from the truth as most of the pieces in Mint State holders are marginal quality and the number of true Uncirculated pieces is probably in the area of nine to twelve.









1853 gold dollar coin







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